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Archive for October, 2013|Monthly archive page

Nano Tools for Leaders XXXVI

In Leadership, Nano Tools, Wharton on October 22, 2013 at 8:42 pm

Building Resilience: “REAL” Ways to Thrive During Tough Times

Nano Tools for Leaders® are fast, effective leadership tools that you can learn and start using in less than 15 minutes — with the potential to significantly impact your success as a leader and the engagement and productivity of the people you lead.

Contributor: Katherine Klein, PhD, Edward H. Bowman Professor of
Management, Vice Dean, Wharton Social Impact Initiative, The Wharton School.


The Goal:

Build resilience in yourself and your team.

Nano Tool:

Resilience — the capacity to bounce back from setbacks or to thrive during times of challenge or change — is not a fixed trait. It actually grows out of a set of “learnable” behaviors with results that interact to make you and your team less vulnerable to stress. Whether you’re dealing with the acute stress of sudden challenges, or the chronic stress of daily life, simple daily actions can increase your resilience. Read the rest of this entry »

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Nano Tools for Leaders XXXV

In Leadership, Nano Tools, Wharton on October 22, 2013 at 8:20 pm

Virtual Communications: Getting the Most from Technology and Your Team

Nano Tools for Leaders® are fast, effective leadership tools that you can learn and start using in less than 15 minutes — with the potential to significantly impact your success as a leader and the engagement and productivity of the people you lead.

Contributor: Nancy Rothbard, PhD, David Pottruck Associate Professor of Management, The Wharton School.


The Goal:

Make virtual communications and meetings more effective.

Nano Tool:

In today’s increasingly global business environment, face-to-face communication is often a rare luxury. The challenge for individual leaders and virtual teams is that we tend to rely on facial expressions and interactive feedback to fully interpret what people say. How do we know we’re being understood and that we understand others without those meaningful inputs? Read the rest of this entry »