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Archive for June, 2013|Monthly archive page

Nano Tools for Leaders XXXIII

In Leadership, Nano Tools, Wharton on June 27, 2013 at 1:56 pm

Find Innovation Success With the “Real-Win-Worth It” Screen

Nano Tools for Leaders® are fast, effective leadership tools that you can learn and start using in less than 15 minutes — with the potential to significantly impact your success as a leader and the engagement and productivity of the people you lead.

Contributor: George Day, PhD, The Geoffrey T. Boisi Professor, Professor of Marketing, The Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania; and author of the new book Innovation Prowess: Leadership Strategies for Accelerating Growth.


The Goal:

Effectively screen new products and services to decide which potential innovations are worth funding.

Nano Tool:

When it comes to innovation, many companies have it backwards. They start with the product or service instead of the market. Research shows that the vast majority of innovations fail because companies don’t ask questions in three key categories: Is there a real market for this? Can we gain and maintain a competitive edge? And will the expected payoff be worth the risks involved?

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Nano Tools for Leaders XXXII

In Leadership, Nano Tools, Wharton on June 27, 2013 at 1:27 pm

Finding New Ideas: The Value of Connecting and Reconnecting

Nano Tools for Leaders® are fast, effective leadership tools that you can learn and start using in less than 15 minutes — with the potential to significantly impact your success as a leader and the engagement and productivity of the people you lead.

Contributor: Adam Grant, PhD, management professor, The Wharton School.  Grant has been recognized as Wharton’s top-rated professor, and is the author of the new book Give and Take: A Revolutionalry Approach to Success.


The Goal:

Leverage the hidden value in your network by making new connections — and reviving old ones.

Nano Tool:

When we’re looking for new ideas, we tend to go to our strong ties: the people we know well and trust. But evidence shows that people are actually more likely to innovate and find new jobs through weak ties. Whereas strong ties tend to hold the same knowledge that we do, weak ties offer more efficient access to novel information. Yet it’s often difficult to reach out to acquaintances, as we lack the trust and shared perspective necessary to ask for advice.

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