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Archive for December, 2012|Monthly archive page

Nano Tools for Leaders XXVII

In Leadership, Nano Tools, Wharton on December 10, 2012 at 9:50 pm

Self-Design: A Tool for Positive Change

Nano Tools for Leaders® are fast, effective leadership tools that you can learn and start using in less than 15 minutes — with the potential to significantly impact your success as a leader and the engagement and productivity of the people you lead.

Contributor: Charles E. Dwyer, PhD, Associate Professor, Educational Leadership Division, Graduate School of Education, University of Pennsylvania


The Goal:

Replace beliefs, behaviors, and emotions that are holding you back with ones that will better help you achieve your goals.

Nano Tool:

A leader’s effectiveness is a direct function of his or her behavior as interpreted by others. While it might be tempting to blame those you lead for their unwillingness to follow, it is your behavior that builds trust, motivation, and influence — or it creates suspicion, apprehension, and discouragement.

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Nano Tools for Leaders XXVI

In Leadership, Nano Tools, Wharton on December 10, 2012 at 9:19 pm

Global Brands, Local Presence: Striking a Balance

Nano Tools for Leaders® are fast, effective leadership tools that you can learn and start using in less than 15 minutes — with the potential to significantly impact your success as a leader and the engagement and productivity of the people you lead.

Contributor: George Day, PhD, The Geoffrey T. Boisi Professor, Professor of Marketing; Co-Director, Mack Center for Technological Innovation; Director, Emerging Technologies Management Research Program, The Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania


The Goal:

Find the right balance between central and local control to gain the best of both for your global brand.

Nano Tool:

One of the most hotly debated issues companies face as they build a global presence or enter a new market is ‘Who gets control of the brand?’ Are the key decisions made centrally by corporate headquarters, or does each local market get to chart their own course for marketing, advertising, pricing, positioning, and perhaps even decisions about naming and branding their own products or services?

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