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Archive for October, 2012|Monthly archive page

Nano Tools for Leaders XXV

In Leadership, Nano Tools, Wharton on October 15, 2012 at 3:23 pm

Negotiation Advantage: Make the First Move

Nano Tools for Leaders® are fast, effective leadership tools that you can learn and start using in less than 15 minutes — with the potential to significantly impact your success as a leader and the engagement and productivity of the people you lead.

Contributor: Adam Grant, PhD, management professor, The Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania


The Goal:

Capture powerful negotiation advantages by knowing whether to make the first offer.

Nano Tool:

Most people believe that you gain a strong advantage in negotiations by letting the other party put an offer on the table first. By waiting for an offer, you receive valuable information about the other side’s bargaining position. But the overwhelming evidence actually favors the opposite strategy: there is usually much more to gain by making the first move yourself.

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Nano Tools for Leaders XXIV

In Leadership, Nano Tools, Wharton on October 15, 2012 at 3:10 pm

Shifting Mindsets: Questions That Lead To Results

Nano Tools for Leaders® are fast, effective leadership tools that you can learn and start using in less than 15 minutes — with the potential to significantly impact your success as a leader and the engagement and productivity of the people you lead.

Contributor: Marilee Adams, PhD; President and founder of the Inquiry Institute; Adjunct Professor at American University, School of Public Affairs, in the Key Executive Leadership Program; and author of Change Your Questions, Change Your Life: 10 Powerful Tools for Life and Work.


The Goal:

Quickly change the mindset of your team — or yourself — from being “stuck” to finding possibilities and solutions.

Nano Tool:

Our mindsets are determined by the questions we ask. Some questions have the potential to catalyze breakthroughs and inspire transformations. Others lead to stagnation and demoralization. The difference lies in whether you ask Learner Questions or Judger Questions.

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