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Archive for the ‘Undergraduate Students’ Category

JOIN THE LIPMAN FAMILY PRIZE PARTNERSHIP: MedShare’s Challenge of Expansion

In Leadership, MBA Students, Nano Tools, Undergraduate Students, Wharton on April 24, 2012 at 10:05 am

Contributed by Kristi Ringen, WG ’01

On Friday, April 13, 2012 the Wharton School and the University of Pennsylvania hosted the inaugural Lipman Family Prize Un-Conference.  This event represented the beginning of Penn’s partnership with the three 2012 Lipman Family Prize finalists:  iDE ,the 2012 Prize winner recognized for its market-based approach to improving sanitation in developing countries;  KOMAZA, a social enterprise that works with rural dryland families in Kenya to grow trees as a cash crop; and MedShare, a US based organization that collects medical surplus supplies and equipment and redistributes them for use in developing countries.  

Each organization posed a specific challenge they currently face to the Un-Conference attendees and the majority of the day was spent in small group discussions further exploring these issues.   In addition to brainstorming potential solutions, each small group also explored a different framework to use when approaching social and organizational challenges of this magnitude.   

The following post is the third in a set of three and provides more detail regarding MedShare’s social challenge and the techniques used to approach the problem in a small group.  Read the rest of this entry »

JOIN THE LIPMAN FAMILY PRIZE PARTNERSHIP: KOMAZA’s Challenge of Horizontal Diversification

In Leadership, MBA Students, Nano Tools, Undergraduate Students, Wharton on April 24, 2012 at 10:04 am

Contributed by Kristi Ringen, WG ’01

On Friday, April 13, 2012 the Wharton School and the University of Pennsylvania hosted the inaugural Lipman Family Prize Un-Conference.  This event represented the beginning of Penn’s partnership with the three 2012 Lipman Family Prize finalists:  iDE ,the 2012 Prize winner recognized for its market-based approach to improving sanitation in developing countries;  KOMAZA, a social enterprise that works with rural dryland families in Kenya to grow trees as a cash crop; and MedShare, a US based organization that collects medical surplus supplies and equipment and redistributes them for use in developing countries. 

Each organization posed a specific challenge that they currently face to the Un-Conference attendees and the majority of the day was spent in small group discussions further exploring these issues.   In addition to brainstorming potential solutions, each small group also explored a different framework to use when approaching social and organizational challenges of this magnitude.   

The following post is the second in a set of three and provides more detail regarding KOMAZA’s social challenge and the techniques used to approach the problem in a small group.  Read the rest of this entry »

JOIN THE LIPMAN FAMILY PRIZE PARTNERSHIP: iDE’s Last Mile Challenge

In Leadership, MBA Students, Nano Tools, Undergraduate Students, Wharton on April 24, 2012 at 10:01 am

Contributed by Kristi Ringen, WG ’01

On Friday, April 13, 2012 the Wharton School and the University of Pennsylvania hosted the inaugural Lipman Family Prize Un-Conference.  This event represented the beginning of Penn’s partnership with the three 2012 Lipman Family Prize finalists:  iDE ,the 2012 Prize winner recognized for its market-based approach to improving sanitation in developing countries;  KOMAZA, a social enterprise that works with rural dryland families in Kenya to grow trees as a cash crop; and MedShare, a US based organization that collects medical surplus supplies and equipment and redistributes them for use in developing countries. 

Each organization posed a specific challenge that they currently face to the Un-Conference attendees and the majority of the day was spent in small group discussions further exploring these issues.   In addition to brainstorming potential solutions, each small group also explored a different framework to use when approaching social and organizational challenges of this magnitude.   

The following post is the first in a set of three and provides more detail regarding iDE’s social challenge and the techniques used to approach the problem in a small group.  Read the rest of this entry »

Student Reflections: 2012 USNA Leadership Conference, Part 3

In Leadership, Student Stories, Undergraduate Students, Wharton on March 18, 2012 at 1:49 pm

U.S. Naval Academy Leadership Conference 2012
Visionary Leadership: Navigating through Unchartered Waters

In the final post of this 3-part series, Anna Pham, WG’12 reflects on lessons from the U.S. Naval Academy’s Leadership Conference in February 2012.  Students from over 20 different schools, military and civilian, gathered in Annapolis, MD for three days of leadership development workshops and experiences.

Reflections from Janani Ramachandran (W’11), Greg Rose (W’12) can be found in posts Part 1 and Part 2.    

 Part 3: Anna Pham, W’12

As the end of January drew near, the thought of having to miss half a week of school for a conference became heavier. Upon arriving in Annapolis and interacting with students and faculty from around the world, this weight quickly lifted as I embarked on the conference program.

   Read the rest of this entry »

Student Reflections: 2012 USNA Leadership Conference, Part 2

In Leadership, Student Stories, Undergraduate Students, Wharton on March 18, 2012 at 1:48 pm

U.S. Naval Academy Leadership Conference 2012
Visionary Leadership: Navigating through Unchartered Waters

In this 3-part series, three undergraduate Wharton students reflect on their lessons from the U.S. Naval Academy’s Leadership Conference in February 2012.  Students from over 20 different schools, military and civilian, gathered in Annapolis, MD for three days of leadership development workshops and experiences.

Reflections from Janani Ramachandran (W’11), Greg Rose (W’12) and Anna Pham (W’12) are featured.  This post is part 2 of a 3 part series.  

 Part 2: Greg Rose, W’12

I feel incredibly grateful to have had the opportunity to attend this year’s U. S. Naval Academy Leadership Conference on “visionary leadership”. I have seldom been challenged to consider the importance of leadership in life or death situations: scenarios in which there is no “next time”  for applying lessons learned. Thus, the military context that served as a backdrop for the conference’s panel discussions, breakout dialogues and keynote speeches helped to drive home a number of salient lessons about effective leadership.   Read the rest of this entry »

Student Reflections: 2012 USNA Leadership Conference, Part 1

In Leadership, Student Stories, Undergraduate Students, Wharton on March 18, 2012 at 1:45 pm

U.S. Naval Academy Leadership Conference 2012
Visionary Leadership: Navigating through Unchartered Waters

In this 3-part series, three undergraduate Wharton students reflect on their lessons from the U.S. Naval Academy’s Leadership Conference in February 2012.  Students from over 20 different schools, military and civilian, gathered in Annapolis, MD for three days of leadership development workshops and experiences.

Reflections from Janani Ramachandran (W’11), Greg Rose (W’12) and Anna Pham (W’12) are featured.  We’ll bring you their reflections in three parts.

 Part 1: Janani Ramachandran, W’11

What is the definition of success? Prior to attending the United States Naval Academy Conference I would have said a variety of things: getting good grades, having close friends, or landing the “perfect” job. I wanted to accumulate titles and achievements to prove to others that I was smart and capable.  When things didn’t go as planned, I handled it with frustration and a little self-pity, wondering why I needed to suffer through obstacles on my path to success.

  Read the rest of this entry »

Student Reflections: USNA Leadership Conference, Part 3

In Leadership, Student Stories, Undergraduate Students, Wharton on April 25, 2011 at 1:44 pm

The final post in a 3-part series, three undergraduate Wharton students reflect on their lessons from the U.S. Naval Academy’s Leadership Conference in February 2011.  Students from over 20 different schools, military and civilian, gathered in Annapolis, MD for three days of leadership development workshops and experiences.

Reflections from Colin Lee (W’11), Patrick Glover (W’11) and Christian Hoogerheyde (W’11) are featured.  This is the final part of a 3-part series.

Part 3: Christian Hoogerheyde, W’11
Christian HoogerheydeFor as long as I could remember, I was consumed with an overwhelming sense of personal pride. My pride became impossible to ignore when I held student leadership positions in middle school and high school, for I succumbed to what I have termed the “When I’m Gone” syndrome: the desire to be “missed” when I had moved on from a position of leadership and the subconscious hope that others might grieve my departure and compare the accomplishments of my successors to my own.  I am ashamed to admit this, but I remember feeling that I wanted my successors to be good, but not too good, so that my achievements might still shine in comparison. 

It wasn’t until recently, however, that I became aware of how terribly detrimental this perspective (and pride as a whole) was for my ability to become a great leader.  Fortunately, my pursuit of genuine humility was re-ignited during the United States Naval Academy’s leadership conference.   One speech in particular really encouraged me to re-examine my pride and its consequences on my ability to truly lead. Read the rest of this entry »

Student Reflections: USNA Leadership Conference, Part 2

In Leadership, Student Stories, Undergraduate Students, Wharton on April 25, 2011 at 1:33 pm

Our latest series of student reflections focuses on a group of undergraduates who attended the US Naval Academy conference, Leadership Development: The Cycle of Success in February 2011.  Students from over 20 different schools, military and civilian, gathered in Annapolis, MD for three days of leadership development workshops and experiences.

Three Wharton undergrads, Colin Lee (W’11), Patrick Glover (W’11) and Christian Hoogerheyde (W’11) reflected on the lessons learned from the conference that they hope to share with their successors in undergraduate Wharton Leadership Ventures and with the Wharton community broadly.  This is Part 2 of a 3-part series.

Part 2: Patrick Glover, W’11
Patrick GloverFor me, the biggest takeaway was that the most effective leaders are those that know themselves best. Introspection is key. The conference has taught me the importance of identifying my own personal leadership strengths and weaknesses. Colonel Arthur Athens, US Naval Academy’s Director of the Stockdale Center for Ethical Leadership, really impacted me when he spoke about identifying your “sweet spot”.  The “sweet spot” is the situation and environment in which we lead at our best. Identifying this can help us all become better leaders across a range of different situations. We should strive to put ourselves in “sweet spot” situations and take action once we identify such situations. But perhaps even more importantly, we need to recognize when we are outside of our “sweet spot”; in these cases we can look to others for leadership. I had never thought about leadership from a “sweet spot”, but it makes complete sense to me now. Read the rest of this entry »

Student Reflections: USNA Leadership Conference, Part 1

In Leadership, Student Stories, Undergraduate Students, Wharton on April 25, 2011 at 1:17 pm

In February 2011, undergraduate students attended the US Naval Academy conference, Leadership Development: The Cycle of Success.  Students from over 20 different schools, military and civilian, gathered in Annapolis, MD for three days of leadership development workshops and experiences.

Three Wharton undergrads, Colin Lee (W’11), Patrick Glover (W’11) and Christian Hoogerheyde (W’11) reflect on the lessons learned from the conference that they hope to share with their successors in undergraduate Wharton Leadership Ventures and with the Wharton community broadly.  We’ll bring you their reflections in three parts.

Part 1: Colin Lee, W’11
Colin Lee, WG'11For me, the first lesson sounds simple, but it’s subtle and extremely important. It’s to enjoy being a leader and to lead when you have the chance.  Though I’m good with connecting with people, I’ve always been a “background” type of person.  Now, I think I’ve re-structured my thought process so I stop comparing the quality of my ideas; now, I don’t really worry if my ideas seem stupid.  For instance, at this leadership conference, I took the opportunity to ask questions.  From my experience of being involved in WLV, I am more keenly aware of and willing to take on leadership opportunities. Read the rest of this entry »

LBW: Summer Business Institute for High Schoolers

In Leadership, Undergraduate Students, Wharton on November 4, 2010 at 9:58 am

As winter inches closer in Philadelphia, our Undergraduate Leadership team is taking time to reflect on last summer’s successful business institute – Leadership in the Business World (LBW).  LBW, now on the Wharton campuses in Philadelphia and San Francisco, welcomed 110 highly talented high school seniors who hailed from Arizona to Oklahoma and from Colombia to Uzbekistan. Overall, 17 countries and 21 states were represented.  LBW is another example of the way in which we look at leadership development as a lifelong practice, and strive to reach students at all stages of their careers. 

LBW provides students with an unforgettable experience. Through seminars with Wharton and WEMBA faculty, LBW participants are exposed to a world-class business education. In their core entrepreneurship course, students worked in teams to create and develop a business plan. Students learned about a variety of career paths and business industries through visits to groundbreaking companies such as Google, Tesla, Citigroup, and American Express. At the culmination of LBW, students presented original business plans to a panel of Wharton faculty and venture capitalists at The Wharton School.

Based on student feedback, LBW 2010 was transformational for participants. One student’s assessment: “LBW has really helped me grow and change the way that I think. I have grown so much emotionally by working with the team and learning from all of the professors, RTAs and students around me. They helped me bring out the best of my personality and learn more about myself. I have also definitely expanded my knowledge and learned more about business and college than I could’ve ever imagined. LBW has definitely been of the greatest experiences of my life.”

 We look forward to welcoming next year’s LBW class in summer 2011 and encourage interested rising high school seniors to apply. Click here to learn more about Wharton’s Summer Business Institutes.  Questions? Contact Aviva Legatt at aviva@wharton.upenn.edu.