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Archive for June, 2012|Monthly archive page

Nano Tools for Leaders XXII

In Leadership, Nano Tools, Wharton on June 6, 2012 at 10:54 am

The Attribute Map: A Tool for Creating Competitive Advantage, Part I

Nano Tools for Leaders® are fast, effective leadership tools that you can learn and start using in less than 15 minutes — with the potential to significantly impact your success as a leader and the engagement and productivity of the people you lead.

Contributor: Ian MacMillan, The Dhirubhai Ambani Professor of Innovation and Entrepreneurship; Professor of Management; Director, Sol C. Snider Entrepreneurial Research Center, The Wharton School


The Goal:

Build ongoing competitive advantage by knowing what your customers care about most.

Nano Tool:

Creating value for customers is dynamic: yesterday’s differentiators become tomorrow’s taken-for-granted norms. To stay competitive, you need a simple way to assess what matters most to each of your customer segments. Armed with this knowledge, you can optimize your innovation investments by focusing on the areas with the highest perceived value for your customers.
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Nano Tools for Leaders XXI

In Leadership, Nano Tools, Wharton on June 6, 2012 at 10:13 am

Drive Your Initatives With Sponsors

Nano Tools for Leaders® are fast, effective leadership tools that you can learn and start using in less than 15 minutes — with the potential to significantly impact your success as a leader and the engagement and productivity of the people you lead.

Contributor: Cameron J. Brooks, PhD, Director, Government Healthcare, IBM Global Public Sector


The Goal:

Build a strong network of influential sponsors for your initiatives to ensure that they are supported and protected throughout their life cycles.

Nano Tool:

Inertia is the enemy of growth: for every great idea, there are those who prefer the status quo. This can be true in companies large and small, because inertia is self-perpetuating. Even if you get a new initiative off the ground, you can lose the resources you need to complete it. The success of your projects can’t be left to you and your team alone. Instead, you need to build a network of support inside and outside the organization — your own set of “corporate sponsors” — to help you develop your initiatives, protect them as they grow, and transition them into the wider organization.

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